April 14th, 2011
07:03 PM GMT
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The BP shareholders’ meeting, held in London Thursday, fell almost a year after the Deepwater Horizon explosion in the Gulf of Mexico.
 
The explosion killed 11 men, released the biggest oil spill in U.S.history and cost the company tens of billions of dollars.

The men were not forgotten, with the deaths prompting emotional exchanges between BP’s executives, including its new chief executive Bob Dudley, and shareholders.

At one point, an audience member read a letter from Keith Jones, the father of Gordon Jones who had died on the rig. The message to BP executives: “You were rolling the dice with my son's life, and you lost."

The meeting came the same day BP announced a last minute deadline extension for its $16 billion share swap deal with Russian oil giant Rosneft. The deal – which would allow exploration into Russia’s Arctic shelf – has been met with hefty resistance from shareholders in TNK-BP, BP’s Russian partner. The deadline has now been extended from Thursday to May 16, 2011.

And so BP’s troubles continue, with hopes the Rosneft deal might have signalled a new start now dashed.

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April 14th, 2011
01:07 PM GMT
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April 14th, 2011
07:53 AM GMT
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In the 19th Episode of 'The Boss,' Michael Wu of HK Maxim Group lays out his plans for Mainland China.

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April 14th, 2011
04:39 AM GMT
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Hong Kong, China (CNN) – China has been cracking down on dissent of late, as the recent detainment of artist Ai Weiwei suggests.

But the latest guidance on television programming from the State Administration of Radio Film and Television in China borders on the surreal – or, rather, an attack against the surreal.

New guidelines issued on March 31 discourage plot lines that contain elements of "fantasy, time-travel, random compilations of mythical stories, bizarre plots, absurd techniques, even propagating feudal superstitions, fatalism and reincarnation, ambiguous moral lessons, and a lack of positive thinking."

“The government says … TV dramas shouldn’t have characters that travel back in time and rewrite history. They say this goes against Chinese heritage,” reports CNN’s Eunice Yoon. “They also say that myth, superstitions and reincarnation are all questionable.”

The Chinese censors seem to be especially sensitive these days. But for the television and film industry, such strictures would seem to eliminate any Chinese version of “Star Trek,” “The X-Files,” “Quantum Leap” or “Dr. Who.”  And does that mean rebroadcast of huge Hollywood moneymakers like “Back to the Future” and the “Terminator” series are now forbidden?

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