April 14th, 2011
01:07 PM GMT
Share this on:



April 14th, 2011
07:53 AM GMT
Share this on:


In the 19th Episode of 'The Boss,' Michael Wu of HK Maxim Group lays out his plans for Mainland China.

Filed under: Quest Means BusinessThe Boss


April 14th, 2011
04:39 AM GMT
Share this on:

Hong Kong, China (CNN) – China has been cracking down on dissent of late, as the recent detainment of artist Ai Weiwei suggests.

But the latest guidance on television programming from the State Administration of Radio Film and Television in China borders on the surreal – or, rather, an attack against the surreal.

New guidelines issued on March 31 discourage plot lines that contain elements of "fantasy, time-travel, random compilations of mythical stories, bizarre plots, absurd techniques, even propagating feudal superstitions, fatalism and reincarnation, ambiguous moral lessons, and a lack of positive thinking."

“The government says … TV dramas shouldn’t have characters that travel back in time and rewrite history. They say this goes against Chinese heritage,” reports CNN’s Eunice Yoon. “They also say that myth, superstitions and reincarnation are all questionable.”

The Chinese censors seem to be especially sensitive these days. But for the television and film industry, such strictures would seem to eliminate any Chinese version of “Star Trek,” “The X-Files,” “Quantum Leap” or “Dr. Who.”  And does that mean rebroadcast of huge Hollywood moneymakers like “Back to the Future” and the “Terminator” series are now forbidden?

FULL POST

Posted by: ,
Filed under: China


April 13th, 2011
07:23 PM GMT
Share this on:



April 13th, 2011
05:33 AM GMT
Share this on:

(CNN) - Who works the most minutes each day at home and work?

Japan may be the first to spring to mind, with its legendary work ethic, but according to the latest study by the Organization of Economic Co-operation and Development, Japan comes in second place with an average of  540 minutes, or nine hours, spent doing paid work and chores such as shopping and cooking.

So what nation is the hardest working in the world? Mexico, according to the OECD.

As the chart above shows breaking down daily minutes of work, Mexicans spend 594 minutes, or 9.9 hours, doing paid or unpaid work each day.

The nation that works the least, according to the survey of 29 economies, is Belgium with a total of 427 minutes (7.1 hours) of work each day.

The OECD average was 277 minutes (4.6 hours) of paid work, and 207 minutes (3.45 hours) of unpaid work each day.

How much some other major economies worked: China (8.4 hours of paid and unpaid work), The U.S. (8.3 hours), India (8.1 hours), Australia (8 hours), the UK (7.8 hours), France (7.5 hours) and Germany (7.4 hours).

In total minutes of paid work only, Japan worked the most with 6.3 hours on average each day.  Denmark worked the least paid time (3.75 hours).

Mexico had the highest average of unpaid work (4.2 hours) and Korea the least (1.3 hours).

French spent the most unpaid time doing shopping each day (32 minutes) while Koreans did the least (13 minutes).



April 12th, 2011
12:41 PM GMT
Share this on:



April 12th, 2011
05:51 AM GMT
Share this on:

The Tata name is everywhere in India. CNN Executive Insider finds out what makes Ratan Tata so indispensable.

Filed under: Executive Insider


April 11th, 2011
07:31 PM GMT
Share this on:

He arrived decades ago on Wall Street with long hair and turquoise jewelry. Today, he presides over the world's largest money manager, with assets of more than $3.5 trillion.

BlackRock CEO Larry Fink has emerged in recent years as a pre-eminent force in the post-recession financial world, but maintains a lower profile than many of his contemporaries. In addition to the funds it controls, the company recently helped the Irish government evaluate the strength of its banking system.

"We're involved in some enormous things that can change the course of countries," says Fink, when asked about what he still enjoys about the job after more than 20 years. "Our stress tests in Ireland that we are doing. Our auctions now for Maiden Lane II for the Federal Reserve. These are very important, visible things and we take it very seriously."

His reference to the so-called Maiden Lane fund is certainly topical: BlackRock is currently overseeing the auction of nearly $40 billion worth of sub-prime assets bought by the Fed from AIG as it teetered on the brink of bankruptcy. It puts the firm in the unusual position of having the world's most powerful central bank as a client. How does he keep track of the firm’s many tentacles?

"We are the largest shareholder of corporations worldwide. We have a 5% position in 2,500 companies worldwide. And I don't manage money myself so I can't tell you what we are doing with one specific stock... Did I have any idea we would be of this scale? Not at all. But it is exciting as the leader of this firm watching it grow."

We met Fink at BlackRock's global headquarters in midtown Manhattan. Housed in a non-descript tower, the offices are immaculately maintained and have the discreet aroma of a luxury business hotel. One floor was largely deserted and the trading floor seemed to have an excess of desks and Bloomberg terminals.

Still, it was a busy session, with events moving fast in the Middle East. For Fink, markets need to look past the conflict in Libya.

"The area I am most concerned about is Bahrain. Bahrain is a causeway. On the other side of that bridge are the oilfields of Saudi Arabia. That area of Eastern Saudi Arabia is also where all of the many Shiites are. So the problem you see in Bahrain, which is being funded by Iran, is the most important thing to watch.”

He planned to fly to Saudi Arabia the following week, to learn more about the situation on the ground and offer BlackRock's support to regional clients. During a time of such global instability, the role of a CEO must surely be more vital than ever. Before we left, we asked him what his best and worst management qualities are.

"Intense neuroses. That's positive and negative. I am what I am. You can see me on my sleeve,“ he says brandishing his wrist.  There is no evidence of turquoise jewelry, but the enthusiam remains undimmed.



April 11th, 2011
12:01 PM GMT
Share this on:

The Icelandic people are known for their independent nature, isolated at the northern tip of Europe, but their second “no” vote on bailing out investors from Britain and The Netherlands will keep them entangled in European courts for a long while.

There are only 320,000 citizens of Iceland, but they continue to punch well above their weight in their desire to reject a bailout of nearly $6 billion “foreigners” who invested in the on-line division Icesave of Landsbanki.

FULL POST



April 8th, 2011
03:18 AM GMT
Share this on:

Beijing, China (CNN) – The Chinese government has confirmed that one of the nation's best known artists, Ai Weiwei, is in custody and is being investigated for "economic crimes."

"It has nothing to do with human rights or freedom of expression," said Hong Lei, spokesman for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, at a regular briefing with reporters.

This is the first official acknowledgment that Ai is being held after the fierce critic of the Communist regime was taken by police over the weekend at the Beijing airport on his way to Hong Kong.

People who follow the dissident community say it is not uncommon for political activists to be investigated for economic crimes. They say when officials are having trouble building a case against a target, the authorities opt to accuse them of economic crimes such as tax evasion or corruption to discredit them publicly.

Ai's mother told us the suspicions were ridiculous and says her son doesn't have any financial issues. The family hasn't heard from the artist. His lawyer says he has no details of the charges and argues that even if Ai did have financial issues, they should have been handled in a different way.

He says the authorities are not following proper legal procedures despite the ministry's insistence that the investigation is proceeding according to Chinese law.

Posted by: ,
Filed under: China


About Business 360

CNN International's business anchors and correspondents get to grips with the issues affecting world business, and they want your questions and feedback.

 
 
Powered by WordPress.com VIP