June 6th, 2011
06:18 PM GMT
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Singapore (CNN) – The airline industry is tough. No doubt about it. Between 2000-2010 the group of 230 airlines that make up the International Air Transport Association (IATA) managed to post just three profitable years as a group. In 2006, 2007 and 2010 they collectively earned $39 billion dollars. In the other seven years they racked up losses of $68 billion dollars, according to IATA figures. Yes, billion.

Yet during that time only a handful of well-known carriers - Swissair, Varig, Ansett, Sabena, Mexicana and Aloha among others - disappeared. How did the others manage to survive?

There are still about 1000 carriers worldwide, says IATA. The question is why.
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June 6th, 2011
05:20 PM GMT
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A chill Atlantic wind rolled into Lisbon this morning, seen by some as a reminder of the tough times ahead for Portugal after last night's elections saw the Socialist party swept from power.

In his victory speech, Portugal's Prime Minister Elect, Pedro Passos Coelho of the Social Democrats, made it clear that the country should prepare itself for some serious belt-tightening. But he also told his electorate it would emerge stronger.

"We must have courage, we must have patience," he told crowds in one of Lisbon's main squares hours after the polls closed.

"We know the results will not happen in two days. It will be hard but it will be worth it."
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June 6th, 2011
03:03 PM GMT
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June 6th, 2011
01:48 PM GMT
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June 6th, 2011
03:14 AM GMT
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(CNN) – When it comes to tech stocks, are we partying like it’s 1999—again?

I spoke with Tiernan Ray, Senior Editor of Barrons.com and asked him that very question. He says no. This is certainly a party, but it’s different than the tech bubble that burst. Why? Valuations, plain and simple.

Right now we have a slew of high-flying IPO’s.  Just look at LinkedIn.  The internet darling’s shares more than doubled on the first trading day and have stayed in the stratosphere even after settling down in a rough trading week.

China’s tech boom is just beginning.  Recently we’ve watched Ren Ren hit the market, along with Russia’s Yandex, and of course, just days ago, Groupon.  Tiernan Ray says the hyped-up IPO’s may very well be over-priced, but to him, almost everything else looks beaten down.

Some major Groupon and LinkedIn investors spoke out last week saying the same thing: No bubble, no way.  Hugh Grieves, manager of the Herald Worldwide fund was quoted online as saying, “It only becomes a bubble when you see your grandmother invest,” a great line and a reminder of the “unnatural investors” we saw buying tech stocks at random in 1999 looking to day-trade for a quick buck.

However, other analysts insist a bubble in tech is inevitable with so many IPO’s flying off the shelves, believing that the tech market remains full of lemons just waiting to die spectacular deaths, and that the continuing U.S. economic slowdown complicates the landscape considerably.



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