July 6th, 2011
10:23 AM GMT
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(CNN) - Protests have rekindled in Cairo’s Tahrir Square on a grand scale. Hundreds are expressing their frustration at what they see as a snail’s pace of change after the Arab uprisings that began in Tunis six months ago.

Now is a good time to take stock since Mohamed Bouazizi, the fruit seller, lit himself on fire as he was unable to see a way out of poverty. Protestors took to the streets, putting their lives on the line, and expectations were high that change would follow. But we are witnessing a dangerous reality gap of what protestors expect and what governments have been able to deliver.

Mustapha Kamel Nabli Governor of the Central Bank of Tunisia says that reality gap has widened and he is urging regional and global investors to speed into action to assist in the recovery effort.

“If we do not act now we will see failure after the success of the uprising,” said Nabli during a World Economic Forum webinar with government and business leaders.
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July 6th, 2011
07:55 AM GMT
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Tokyo (CNN) – A restaurant in Tokyo is crowded with customers, but on the menu isn’t raw fish, but raw meat – chicken, pork, beef and even horse meat.

About half the customers at “Niku Sushi” (Japanese for “raw meat”) are women like Aya Kanazawa, who comes three times a week and proudly calls herself “a carnivore girl.” It’s not just her culinary tastes she’s talking about. In an odd way, the battle between meat and fish parallels the battle of the sexes and Japan’s moribund economy.

Japan's so-called “carnivore girls” are young, aggressive women. They call the shots in love, act independently and – like Kanazawa – are proud of it.

Girls like Kanazawa are in contrast to Japan’s so-called "herbivore boys," the generation of Japanese youths who are less interested in sex. Borne out of 20 years of national economic stagnation, herbivore boys eschew traditional macho notions of masculinity and employment, choosing not to fulfill the salarimen role of their fathers.

For a country with one of the world’s lowest birthrates – and one of the fastest aging populations – the "herbivore boys" embody the nation’s societal fears.

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July 6th, 2011
04:05 AM GMT
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Hong Kong, (CNN) – The Chinese tourists wandering through Paris’ Louvre this summer or shopping along New York’s Fifth Avenue are part of the nearly 65 million Chinese who will travel abroad this year, according to estimates by the China Tourism Authority.

These tourists are among China’s wealthy. But consider this:  More than 20 times that number of Chinese citizens will travel within China this year.

So for those who can’t afford to visit to Europe, Chinese tourism developers are trying to bring Europe to China.

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