September 29th, 2011
03:10 AM GMT
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New York (CNN) – Amazon didn't just light a fire to the tech world Wednesday, it threw out an atom bomb –  a tablet for $199, less than half the price of the cheapest iPad. Not only that, CEO Jeff Bezos also announced a new line-up of better, cheaper Kindles ranging from $149 for a 3G Kindle Touch to $79 for the most basic model (versions without ads are slightly more).

When those prices were unveiled at the press event in New York, the jaws of even the most skeptical tech journalists dropped. FULL POST



September 29th, 2011
02:41 AM GMT
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Hong Kong (CNN) - Chile and Venezuela, two countries in the opposite of the South American political spectrum, have something in common: both are interested in the Chinese yuan, or renminbi.

With the growing clout of the world’s second largest economy and the slow but constant strengthening of its currency, the yuan is an increasingly attractive choice for reserve currency. While there currently are restrictions in its transactions, the two South American countries lead the flight from the U.S. dollar in the region.

In its latest monetary policy report, the Chilean central bank introduced a new item in its balance sheet with the appearance of $91 million of the country's reserves in yuan. It's a first exploratory step, according to high-level officials from the country. "It's about 0.3% of the international reserves," bank officials said in an e-mail to CNN. Still, plans are afoot in Chile to increase its Chinese currency holdings, bank officials said. FULL POST

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Filed under: China


September 29th, 2011
02:02 AM GMT
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Phnom Penh, Cambodia (CNN) – The hunt for heat is part of the lure of many Asian cuisines. China has its addictive, mouth-numbing Sichuan peppercorn. Thailand has the "do I dare" burn of the bird's eye chili.

In Cambodia, heat comes in the form of a Kampot peppercorn, tiny but bursting with spice and an additional depth that ranges from citrus to nutty.

Grown in the Kampot province in Southern Cambodia, this special pepper reached its hey-day in the mid-20th century, when chefs in Europe prized its unique strength and flavor.

The pepper disappeared off the world stage though in the 1970s, when the destructive Khmer Rouge regime isolated Cambodia from the outside world. Farmers neglected their pepper fields and exports from Cambodia were cut off. FULL POST

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Filed under: BusinessOutlook Cambodia


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