December 15th, 2011
01:19 PM GMT
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Copenhagen (CNN) – Jens Bjorn Andersen, boss of Danish transport giant DSV, has a message for Europe’s politicians: Deal with Europe’s crisis like he has streamlined his business. Stop over-spending, trim the headcount and get a grip on costs.

Those struggling to rein in the eurozone’s ongoing debt problems might want to listen. DSV is one of those companies that you probably haven’t heard of but, once you do, you’ll see their logo everywhere.

After interviewing Andersen at DSV’s Copenhagen headquarters, we spent eight hours on the road. To pass the time, we played a game spotting DSV transporters. They have around 17,000 trucks on the road every day, and we spied at least one a minute.

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December 15th, 2011
10:53 AM GMT
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Cape Town (CNN) – Asian trade and investment in Africa is growing, but where investment in Africa has traditionally concentrated on natural resources, India is looking to diversify its interests in the African continent.

In recent years, India has made new inroads into African markets. Tata, which is owned by one of India's richest men, recently built a new truck-manufacturing plant outside Pretoria, South Africa, producing heavy vehicles that are sold in Africa.

“You cannot constantly keep importing finished vehicles,” Raman Dhawan, who runs Tata's African operations, told CNN's Robyn Curnow.

“We've started actually with just assembling the commercial vehicles, which is the trucks and bus chassis, and so as we move forward, yes, we will explore others,” he added. “So the basic thing is that you must put investment, add value locally and that's what we've really followed.”

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December 15th, 2011
06:12 AM GMT
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London (CNN) – Does toy marketing ingrain gender stereotypes?

Hamleys, the famous London toy store, has taken down gender signs for its toys in the wake of a campaign by a feminist blogger that the store’s blue-and-pink marked floors were sexist.

Previously, the fifth floor of the Regent Street flagship store – where action figure and war-themed toys were sold – was marked with a blue “Boys” sign. Gone, too, is the third floor “Girls” sign which sells dolls and craft toys.

Blogger Laura Nelson started the campaign with an October post that accused the store of promoting “gender apartheid.”
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Filed under: BusinessQuest Means Business


December 15th, 2011
02:34 AM GMT
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London (CNN) – Europe’s new treaty – dubbed the “fiscal compact” – is facing some hard realities on the ground. Signs the deal could be difficult to push through in both euro and non-euro countries are emerging.

In Warsaw, protestors have rallied against, among other things, Poland’s tacit agreement to lose some sovereignty to join the European treaty club. In London, political bickering continues over British Prime Minister David Cameron’s veto of the European deal.

In Ireland, a referendum may need to be held, with Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny noting some detailed technical and legal considerations are yet to be clarified. Swedish Finance Minister Anders Borg says the country - which does not use the euro - would not agree to all the budget discipline rules. And the Czech Prime Minister Petr Necas has said the proposed pact is still just a blank piece of paper.

In Germany, Chancellor Angela Merkel told the Bundestag the path to stability continued. In Italy, new Prime Minister Mario Monti said the deal had done enough to calm the markets.

But on Wednesday U.S. stocks fell, the euro dropped to its lowest level in 11 months and Italian bond yields rose.

European leaders promised to sign off on this fiscal compact at its next leaders' summit in March. Will the markets give them the time to fill in the details...  and the cracks?



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