April 19th, 2012
05:00 PM GMT
Share this on:

Vancouver (CNN) – Vancouver is Canada's Pacific gateway to Asia, with 40% of its residents born overseas. The city is regarded as a model of integration. CNN's Paula Newton looks at Vancouver's long history of immigration.

Filed under: BusinessFuture Cities


April 19th, 2012
03:31 PM GMT
Share this on:

London (CNN) – On Sunday the French head to the polls to elect the next French president. Voters may be intellectualizing who offers the best deal for them, but the business community has a different set of priorities.

They want changes to the business environment and more flexible labour laws to allow them to flourish. Yet I’ve spoken to bosses who fear that instead, the next President of France will tax small and medium firms out of business.

The French economy desperately needs structural reform. Unemployment, at 10%, is higher than it has been for 12 years, public spending is too high and growth is a piffling 1.7%.

How election will be decided

Other European countries in economic strife have embraced austerity packages: Think Italy, Ireland, Portugal and Spain. Admittedly, there are varying levels of success, and austerity is never going to be a vote-winner.

FULL POST



April 19th, 2012
11:10 AM GMT
Share this on:

Inner Mongolia, China (CNN) - The Mongols once dominated China, just part of their vast empire stretching from Moscow to Guangzhou. Eventually, the Chinese chased out their conquerers and claimed Mongol land - an area now known as Inner Mongolia.

Today, only one in five of the autonomous region's near 20-million people are ethnic Mongolian, leading to fears their culture could disappear.

Anda Union, a traditional Mogolian folk singer, told CNN’s Eunice Yoon: "It is very difficult for us to preserve our Mongolian culture in this big cultural environment because there are so many different cultures all competing with each other.”

FULL POST



April 19th, 2012
04:54 AM GMT
Share this on:

(CNN) – It’s been a bad year to be a foreign CEO in Japan.

At the start of 2011, there were four non-Japanese CEOs who led listed Japanese companies. Now, with the sudden resignation Wednesday of Craig Naylor – the American appointed as CEO to the Nippon Sheet Glass Group two years ago – there is only one: Carlos Ghosn, the CEO of Nissan.

“Craig Naylor’s decision to tender his resignation reflected fundamental disagreements with the Board on company strategy,” said NSG’s Group Chairman Katsuji Fujimoto in a statement.

That comes after Howard Stringer stepped down after seven years as CEO of Sony Corp. earlier this month, and the epic drama of Michael Woodford, the former CEO of Olympus Corp. who turned whistleblower after he discovered a cover-up of $1.7 billion in losses.

The Olympus saga and paucity of foreign CEOs illustrates Japan’s struggle – despite a dropping birth rate and aging population – to bring in foreign talent, whether to run top corporations or staff retirement homes to counter a national shortage of healthcare workers.
FULL POST

Posted by: ,
Filed under: BusinessJapan


About Business 360

CNN International's business anchors and correspondents get to grips with the issues affecting world business, and they want your questions and feedback.

 
 
Powered by WordPress.com VIP