June 29th, 2012
06:37 PM GMT
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This was supposed to be Research In Motion’s come-back moment. Its last chance to show that the newest Blackberry, the 10, was going to be amazing enough to silence all those voices who said Blackberry was dead. It was not that moment.

Instead, Blackberry released quarterly results that confirmed analysts’ worst fears: It is bleeding cash, laying off a third of its workforce and delaying the launch of Blackberry 10 - again.

I don’t know why I am surprised. At every turn, at every opportunity to right itself, Blackberry management has failed miserably, smiling as they dig the grave. It seems incredible that current CEO Thorsten Heins can cling to the idea of launching the Blackberry 10 sometime next year - after the next generation iPhone comes out, after the holiday sales season, in dead of winter when consumers have no money left.

Even more incredible – the Blackberry 10 will not have a physical keyboard – just a touch screen. What? Isn’t the keyboard the reason people love their blackberry?

Talk to an analyst about RIM these days and all they can do is shake their heads. Before this earnings report there was a small glimmer of hope that maybe, just maybe, Research In Motion could do what Steve Jobs did back in the 1990s and bring the company back from the brink. But Blackberry is no Apple.

When I asked technology analyst Peter Misek, of Jefferies & Co., whether Blackberry put itself on the block as a whole he was pessimistic. “It will be very difficult for anyone to buy them," he said. "A buyer would have to get a handle on the fundamentals and they are deteriorating too rapidly.”

Analysts have slashed their forecasts and at least one is now on record saying RIM will fail and be out of the market by 2020. Others continue to think that the company’s intellectual property and user base have value, but they say management has to get more serious about selling.

It is hard to stay on top in the rapidly evolving tech space, but if companies had tombstones, RIM’s would say, Killed by Management.

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June 28th, 2012
07:19 PM GMT
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Editor's note: David Buik has spent almost 50 years in the City of London, as an investment banker and broker. He is a partner at BGC Partners and a frequent media commentator on financial matters.

CNN – He may be an octogenarian but anyone who underestimates Rupert Murdoch’s business cunning and prowess does so at his or her peril.

He is probably at his most dangerous when his back is against the wall.

I enjoyed his interrogation at the Leveson inquiry and he was in imperious form when being interviewed Wednesday in the U.S. on his plans and aspirations for his media and publishing enterprises. As the old expression goes: “There’s life in the old dog yet!”

"Uncle Ru" has been deeply and irrevocably in love with newspapers since he left his mother’s womb and under the watchful eye of his father, Sir Keith, he cut his teeth on all journalistic branding irons.

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June 27th, 2012
10:28 AM GMT
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Editor’s note: The Millennials are a generation that are constantly plugged in and moving fast to make their mark on the world. CNN’s Quest Means Business is tracking four of them.

(CNN) –In Johannesburg Milli Bongela takes on a new project, with a little help from a friend. In London, Joe Braidwood welcomes a new team member – as he admits he can’t do it all.

In this show, Joe puts these worries aside, and lets off some steam. He catches up with some friends he hasn’t seen in a while, including his sister.

Milli, meanwhile, recognizes taking time out is a necessity, not a luxury.



June 25th, 2012
03:42 PM GMT
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London (CNN) – Eurobonds will be back on the agenda at the euro crisis summit later this week, with one source telling me there will be “more than twenty different types” under discussion.

Such bonds - a way to raise cash backed by all 17 eurozone countries – have long been floated as one panacea to the bloc's financial crisis but the idea has been stymied by political resistance, largely from German chancellor Angela Merkel.

But as the crisis continues to rumble on the introduction of eurobonds looks increasingly likely. And the ascendancy of eurobond advocate Francois Hollande, France’s new president, has thrown weight behind the idea.
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June 22nd, 2012
12:37 PM GMT
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Abu Dhabi (CNN) – Growing economic ties between the UAE and South Korea are encouraging an influx of Koreans into the Gulf nation.

There are currently an estimated 7,500 Korean in the UAE, and that number is expected to reach 13,000 in the next two years.

Lee Hyo-Won owns a restaurant in Abu Dhabi and has experienced the influx first hand. “Twelve years ago, it's not easy finding Koreans in the street. Now we can see anywhere, shopping malls, schools, it's easy to find Koreans,” she told CNN’s Schams Elwazer.

Last year, trade between South Korea and the UAE grew 24% to $22 billion. The boom is riding the economic momentum created in 2009 when the UAE granted a South Korean consortium a $20 billion contract to build four nuclear reactors - the first in the region outside of Iran and Israel.

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June 21st, 2012
07:43 PM GMT
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London (CNN) – Controversial and caddish to some, funny and forthright to others, former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi is arguably the most high profile scalp claimed by the eurozone crisis so far.

Whether it was the ‘Bunga Bunga’ scandal or the unbalanced budgets that booted the former cruise-ship crooner out of office remains a point of discussion.

One thing you can’t argue with however is that eurozone membership has robbed Italy of its traditional tool for tackling boom and bust cycles: The currency devaluation.

Cue Berlusconi, who Italians often call "Il Cavaliere." “Leaving the euro is not blasphemy…” writes the 75-year old on his Facebook page.

"What would happen if Italy, Spain or Greece went back to their old currencies? I don't know, maybe there would be a loss of wealth but I don't understand why," Berlusconi later told Italian news agencies.
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June 21st, 2012
06:30 PM GMT
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Copenhagen (CNN) - Meeting the men and women whose inventions have changed how we live our lives seems a world away from the daily bombardment of news on the state of Europe’s economy.

While the markets were reeling over Spain’s bank bailout, and trading floor chatter was Greece, Italy and what the European Central Bank can, can’t or should do, the Marketplace Europe team was at the European Inventor Awards in Copenhagen.

It was truly inspirational and refreshing to think about business without focusing on what has gone wrong, how companies are struggling and what impact this is having on the global economy. FULL POST



June 21st, 2012
07:00 AM GMT
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Editor’s note: The Millennials are a generation that are constantly plugged in and moving fast to make their mark on the world. CNN’s Quest Means Business is tracking four of them.

(CNN) - Aspiring actor Michael Burbach graduates to an uncertain future, like tens of thousands of Millennials across the U.S. entering a difficult job market.

But a big break is right around the corner. Meanwhile in London, Joe Braidwood finds that in the juggle to push himself, some balls get dropped.

Filed under: The Millennials


June 21st, 2012
06:24 AM GMT
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(CNN) – For nearly a decade, the U.S. box office has been ruled by the comic book hero. Think Batman, Iron Man and X-Men.

But when “The Amazing Spider-Man” makes its debut next week, it won’t be Americans holding the tickets.

The Columbia Pictures film, starring Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone, is set to open June 29th in Hong Kong, the Philippines and a slew of other Asian countries, nearly a week before it hits theaters in the United States on July 3.

This isn’t the first movie to give foreign audiences a sneak peak. This year alone blockbusters such as “The Avengers,” “Battleship” and “Prometheus” all looked to overseas audiences to kick start their box office figures.
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June 20th, 2012
02:42 PM GMT
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(CNN) - Now that the Greek people have voted and a government will be formed, we need to think about where this crisis will go.

The new Greek government will invariably go to Brussels and ask for some relief; breathing space is the phrase that will be used.

The Europeans will almost certainly grant it - to not do so would be cruel, especially bearing in mind the terrible suffering of people in Greece at the moment.

But outside of Greece what happens now?  Like a balloon that is squeezed, the European crises merely bulge out somewhere else - and that is what is happening now. FULL POST



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