January 29th, 2013
04:05 PM GMT
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Davos, Switzerland (CNN) - For a decade the BRIC nations dominated the emerging markets narrative. But a new narrative has emerged for the post-crisis world. Are Mexico, Nigeria, Philippines, Pakistan and Turkey set to be the new engines of global growth?

Filed under: Global Exchange


January 29th, 2013
03:48 PM GMT
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Davos, Switzerland (CNN) - Ian Bremmer, President of Eurasia Group talks with John Defterios about the implications in 2013 of changes in the global economy.

Filed under: Global Exchange


January 25th, 2013
02:51 PM GMT
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Editor's note:  CNN is at the World Economic Forum in Davos. Follow CNN's coverage here.

(CNN) Here in Davos Richard Quest frequently uses the term "DV."  I am a DV, apparently, and so are a few of my CNN colleagues working here at the WEF.  A DV is a "Davos Virgin" - someone experiencing their first taste of this often crazy place. Richard is definitely not a DV.  Incredibly, John Defterios has been to Davos 22 times.

Reporting from here is a challenge. To begin with, there are the security checks. Entering or exiting the halls means going through airport-style security, and there are watchful eyes all over the building ensuring that no one transgresses the strict rules. Then there are the VIPs' own entourages. Out of nowhere a flock of suited people will glide past, usually with a president or prime minister safely cocooned at its center. Woe betides those who don't quickly jump out of the way.

The second challenge is eating. At Davos the color of your badge denotes whether or not you can partake in the spreads of food that suddenly appear in the main hall and elsewhere. I have a purple badge. Among other things, this means I may not taste these morsels. As there is nowhere to buy food in the conference, we must instead go off-site to buy the very expensive food on offer. As one of my colleagues put it: "They call it 'resilient dynamism,' I call it a 20 dollar pizza."

But actually a purple badge isn't so bad. An anchor from another network showed me her yellow badge. "It means we're basically cockroaches," she said. Like many journalists covering the event, she must travel back and forth from the media center to the conference hall in the snow.

At CNN we don't have to brave the cold quite so much, but there's a different kind of resilience needed to work in what we affectionately call "The Bunker." The Bunker is quite literally a bunker. It's a bomb shelter underneath the hall, with concrete walls and giant steel doors. There is no natural light, and it's very warm. Not only that, but there are up to 20 people working here at any time, touching elbows as they tap away on their laptops.

Meanwhile, up on the roof, camera crew and engineers toil away at our live position, as guests and their entourages are brought up and down the icy stairs by our producers.

But in spite of the conditions, there is fun to be had. You never know who you might bump into wandering along, and walking from an interview with Ehud Barak, bumping into Jacob Zuma and then the head of the WTO is perfectly possible in the space of a few minutes.

Richard calls these encounters "DMs" - Davos Moments.  Davos may be grueling, but these DMs make working here a fascinating experience.

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January 25th, 2013
08:16 AM GMT
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(CNN) – The role of women in economic decision-making, religious tolerance in the 21st Century and the future of the eurozone stand out as a few of the must-watch panels Friday at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

While thousands of global economic, political and civil leaders have paid tens of thousands of dollars to personally attend this year’s summit, you can watch many sessions online and on-demand – without breaking the bank.

Friday’s highlights include the following:

1. “The Economic Malaise and Its Perils”

As the global economy continues its slow crawl back to health, this session looks at the impacts it has left in its wake including high unemployment, loss of wealth and political instability.
Featured speakers include Director-General of the International Labor Organization Guy Ryder, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak and Li Daokui, director of the Center for China in the World Economy.

2. “Women in Economic Decision-making”

With women still greatly under-represented at the highest levels of global economic decision-making, this panel looks at ways to encourage more females to pursue degrees in business and economic-related fields and how to overcome mid-career development hurdles.

Featured speakers include Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, Harvard University President Drew Gilpin Faust and IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde.

3. “Open Forum: Is Religion Outdated in the 21st Century?”

While religions are the oldest institutions in the world, they are the slowest to respond to modern issues such as drugs, homosexuality and family relationships. This session questions whether the world is becoming more or less religious, asks if religion teaches tolerance and delves into the balance of freedoms of speech and religion.

Speakers include Chief Rabbi of the Conference of European Rabbis (Russia) Pinchas Goldschmidt, U.K. National Office for Vocation Director Christopher Jamison, U.S. Catholic Health Association President Carol Keehan and Jakarta Globe Group Chief Editor Shoeb Kagda.

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Filed under: BusinessDavos


January 24th, 2013
05:57 PM GMT
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London (CNN) – “Let’s stop all this talk of two-speed Europe, of fast lanes and slow lanes, of countries missing trains and buses, and consign the whole weary caravan of transport metaphors to a permanent siding.”

The irony is unmistakeable, but this was a serious call to plain speaking. David Cameron’s words, delivered early on in his seminal speech on Britain’s in the European Union, came as a cruel blow to those of us spending our days attempting to illustrate each tiny increment of this crisis with a language that often falls short.

Read more: Cameron promises referendum on Britain's place in Europe

The consequences are difficult to contemplate. We must wave goodbye to the train of European federalism, end all talk of capital flight, and as for the good ship QE…well, she will be consigned to the scrapyard of mere acronyms. And once you do that, there’s no going back. It’s a one-way ticket.

Much like the prospect of Britain leaving the EU, the potential mortality of our metaphors leaves us with a nagging doubt. Can we survive without this linguistic safety net? No sooner had Cameron finished speaking, the cries of protest against a “Europe a la carte” started up, and the French foreign minister Laurent Fabius hit back with a sporting salvo: “Imagine Europe is a football club and you join, but once you're in it you can't say, 'Let's play rugby.'” Had he simply said, “you can’t pick and choose your European experience,” we probably wouldn’t have remembered.
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January 24th, 2013
07:47 AM GMT
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Editor’s Note: Members of the Young Global Leaders forum at the World Economic Forum in Davos share some of their ideas for innovative ways to boost the economy and unleash intellectual capital.

(CNN) – Declining birth rates and longer life expectancy mean that many countries, particularly in the developed world, are faced with aging populations. In Japan, for example, the median age has risen from 22 in 1950 to 45 today and is expected to reach 53 by 2050.

This long-term demographic trend poses huge challenges for affected economies, putting pressure on social welfare systems while dragging on productivity and economic growth. It is worth noting that 17 of the world’s oldest countries in terms of median age are European, creating further challenges to economic recovery in the region.

The problem is exacerbated by social conventions on working age. In 1960, a 65-year-old man had a life expectancy of about 12.8 years but today that figure is about 17.4 years. This rise of almost five years is challenging pension systems and the assumptions that they are based on, particularly the notion in some countries that we should retire at 65 or younger. FULL POST

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January 24th, 2013
07:44 AM GMT
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Editor’s Note: Members of the Young Global Leaders forum at the World Economic Forum in Davos share some of their ideas for innovative ways to boost the economy and unleash intellectual capital.

(CNN) – Is 20% youth unemployment in the western world inevitable?

Will generations of young workers be condemned to precarious work conditions in developed economies, or persistent poverty in the emerging ones?

This doesn’t have to be the new reality.  If we consider that just as the “knowledge economy” defined the 20th century, the “creative economy” will dominate the next. FULL POST

Filed under: BusinessDavos


January 24th, 2013
07:10 AM GMT
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Editor’s Note: Members of the Young Global Leaders forum at the World Economic Forum in Davos share some of their ideas for innovative ways to boost the economy and unleash intellectual capital.

(CNN) – I met a very inspiring person couple of years back and he told me three things that have been a great lesson for me:

  1. The hiring process of organizations are more fine-tuned to reject rather than select people, as most often they are focused on identifying the weakness of people – what they can’t do rather than look at what they can.
  2. Everyone is good at something – we need to find a way to match people’s strength to organization needs.
  3. When you give something to someone who least expects it, they give back to you much more.

That helps explain why my we decided to hire individuals in the autism spectrum at SAP Labs India. FULL POST

Filed under: Davos


January 24th, 2013
05:19 AM GMT
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(CNN)
– Henry Kissinger, Bill Gates, David Cameron, Mario Monti and Thomas Friedman are just several of the headline speakers in the second full day of the 2013 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

While thousands of global economic, political and civil leaders have paid tens of thousands of dollars to personally attend this year’s summit, you can watch many sessions online and on-demand – without breaking the bank.

Thursday’s highlights include:

1. “The State of the World: A Strategic Assessment”

Henry Kissinger, Nobel Peace Prize winner and former Secretary of State for President Richard Nixon, takes the spotlight in this one-on-one session with Klaus Schwab, the founder of the World Economic Forum.

Kissinger, who helped engineer the normalization of U.S. relations with China and the end of the Vietnam War, will discuss how world governments can restore their legitimacy at a time when they are increasingly being challenged, questioned and doubted by their own citizens.

2. “Eurozone Crisis – The Way Forward”

The 17-member union that shares the common Euro currency has been battered by sovereign debt crises over the past three years but is now pulling back from the brink.

This session explores what Europe needs to do next to turn the past few years of crisis into future years of opportunity that stresses fiscal order, more effective frameworks for governance and smart reforms.

Featured speakers include Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti, Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk, the Netherlands’ Prime Minister Mark Rutte, Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny and Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt.

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Filed under: Business


January 23rd, 2013
06:31 AM GMT
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(CNN) – While thousands of global economic, political and civil leaders have paid tens of thousands of dollars to personally attend this year’s World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, with an internet connection you can watch many sessions online and on-demand – with a click of a button and without breaking the bank.

Wednesday’s highlights include the following: FULL POST



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