January 25th, 2013
08:16 AM GMT
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(CNN) – The role of women in economic decision-making, religious tolerance in the 21st Century and the future of the eurozone stand out as a few of the must-watch panels Friday at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

While thousands of global economic, political and civil leaders have paid tens of thousands of dollars to personally attend this year’s summit, you can watch many sessions online and on-demand – without breaking the bank.

Friday’s highlights include the following:

1. “The Economic Malaise and Its Perils”

As the global economy continues its slow crawl back to health, this session looks at the impacts it has left in its wake including high unemployment, loss of wealth and political instability.
Featured speakers include Director-General of the International Labor Organization Guy Ryder, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak and Li Daokui, director of the Center for China in the World Economy.

2. “Women in Economic Decision-making”

With women still greatly under-represented at the highest levels of global economic decision-making, this panel looks at ways to encourage more females to pursue degrees in business and economic-related fields and how to overcome mid-career development hurdles.

Featured speakers include Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, Harvard University President Drew Gilpin Faust and IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde.

3. “Open Forum: Is Religion Outdated in the 21st Century?”

While religions are the oldest institutions in the world, they are the slowest to respond to modern issues such as drugs, homosexuality and family relationships. This session questions whether the world is becoming more or less religious, asks if religion teaches tolerance and delves into the balance of freedoms of speech and religion.

Speakers include Chief Rabbi of the Conference of European Rabbis (Russia) Pinchas Goldschmidt, U.K. National Office for Vocation Director Christopher Jamison, U.S. Catholic Health Association President Carol Keehan and Jakarta Globe Group Chief Editor Shoeb Kagda.

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January 24th, 2013
07:47 AM GMT
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Editor’s Note: Members of the Young Global Leaders forum at the World Economic Forum in Davos share some of their ideas for innovative ways to boost the economy and unleash intellectual capital.

(CNN) – Declining birth rates and longer life expectancy mean that many countries, particularly in the developed world, are faced with aging populations. In Japan, for example, the median age has risen from 22 in 1950 to 45 today and is expected to reach 53 by 2050.

This long-term demographic trend poses huge challenges for affected economies, putting pressure on social welfare systems while dragging on productivity and economic growth. It is worth noting that 17 of the world’s oldest countries in terms of median age are European, creating further challenges to economic recovery in the region.

The problem is exacerbated by social conventions on working age. In 1960, a 65-year-old man had a life expectancy of about 12.8 years but today that figure is about 17.4 years. This rise of almost five years is challenging pension systems and the assumptions that they are based on, particularly the notion in some countries that we should retire at 65 or younger. FULL POST

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January 24th, 2013
07:44 AM GMT
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Editor’s Note: Members of the Young Global Leaders forum at the World Economic Forum in Davos share some of their ideas for innovative ways to boost the economy and unleash intellectual capital.

(CNN) – Is 20% youth unemployment in the western world inevitable?

Will generations of young workers be condemned to precarious work conditions in developed economies, or persistent poverty in the emerging ones?

This doesn’t have to be the new reality.  If we consider that just as the “knowledge economy” defined the 20th century, the “creative economy” will dominate the next. FULL POST

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January 24th, 2013
07:10 AM GMT
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Editor’s Note: Members of the Young Global Leaders forum at the World Economic Forum in Davos share some of their ideas for innovative ways to boost the economy and unleash intellectual capital.

(CNN) – I met a very inspiring person couple of years back and he told me three things that have been a great lesson for me:

  1. The hiring process of organizations are more fine-tuned to reject rather than select people, as most often they are focused on identifying the weakness of people – what they can’t do rather than look at what they can.
  2. Everyone is good at something – we need to find a way to match people’s strength to organization needs.
  3. When you give something to someone who least expects it, they give back to you much more.

That helps explain why my we decided to hire individuals in the autism spectrum at SAP Labs India. FULL POST

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January 23rd, 2013
06:31 AM GMT
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(CNN) – While thousands of global economic, political and civil leaders have paid tens of thousands of dollars to personally attend this year’s World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, with an internet connection you can watch many sessions online and on-demand – with a click of a button and without breaking the bank.

Wednesday’s highlights include the following: FULL POST



January 23rd, 2013
05:03 AM GMT
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(CNN) – A total of 197 million people were without jobs in 2012, with youth being particularly hard hit, and those unemployment figures will increase again this year, according to an International Labor Organization report released Monday.

The bulk of the 4 million newly unemployed in 2012 came from developing economies in East Asia, South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa, according to the Global Employment Trends 2013 report.

The International Labor Organization, which is a United Nations agency responsible for overseeing international labor standards, made bleak projections of another increase in unemployment worldwide by 5.1 million in 2013 - which would push the total to 202 million.
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January 31st, 2012
11:25 AM GMT
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Davos, Switzerland (CNN) — Financial experts gathered together for a CNN discussion were hopeful that emerging markets could weather the financial storm over Europe.

Ali Babacan, deputy prime minister of Turkey, explained how his country’s economy was tied to Europe. “Forty-five percent of our exports go to EU member countries and also we get a lot of FDI from EU member states, so when things go in a bad direction in the EU we are affected through those two channels,” he said.

“But the good part of the picture is 55% of our exports goes elsewhere and those non-European markets are growing quite fast and that is playing a very good balancing role,” he added.

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January 27th, 2012
06:32 PM GMT
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Davos, Switzerland (CNN) – Mark Spelman, head of strategy at Accenture, says emerging markets are spurring innovation.

“I can point to retailers and consumer goods companies who I think are bringing innovation to many emerging markets, through supply chains, through the way they’re addressing consumer preferences in local markets,” he told CNN’s John Defterios.

“But at the same time, you’re seeing a lot of innovation taking place in emerging markets,” he added. “Look at Indonesia, with 50% of the population under 29, real innovation using social media, and that’s going to be leveraged elsewhere.”
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January 27th, 2012
04:00 PM GMT
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Davos, Switzerland (CNN) –
“Bazooka” is competing for word of the year so far. As in, Europe needs to bring out its big bazooka to deal with the debt crisis in which it has been embroiled for nearly two years now.

Mexican President Felipe Calderon, head of the G20 group of countries, brandished the word with gusto at the World Economic Forum in Davos, declaring “we need to take out the bazooka immediately before the powder gets wet.”

Calderon compared the European situation to the economic crisis in Mexico in 1995. That crisis – referred to as “the first financial crisis of the twenty-first century” – exploded after a boom time and the influx of capital. The country was then bailed by the International Monetary Fund, and another country’s money – in this case the U.S. So far, so familiar.

Calderon pointed to the return of confidence that followed the international aid package, noting the same needed to occur in Europe. “The problem is not the money, the problem is the confidence,” he said.

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January 27th, 2012
10:18 AM GMT
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Davos, Switzerland (CNN) – Indian IT giant Wipro is expanding globally to avoid feeling the heat of any slowdown in its top markets – primarily the United States and Europe. But Wipro Chairman Azim Premji said he is not worried about the pace at which those economies are recovering.

“Irrespective of all the slowdown you hear about vis-a-vis the global economy as far as IT is concerned demand is still strong, particularly for global partnering,” Premji told CNN’s John Defterios.

“I think partly it is determined by the fact that U.S. companies are full of cash flow, they’ve established relationships and are growing relationships with global companies, and they’re willing to invest in transformational projects, keep-the-lights-on projects,” he added. FULL POST

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