August 10th, 2012
09:07 AM GMT
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Editor’s note: Outlook is CNN's in-depth look at business climates around the world. To August 12, 2012, we’re focusing on Singapore.

(CNN) – It’s always been a case of two-way traffic in the spirited rivalry between Singapore and Hong Kong to attract expats – those that do a stretch in Singapore often do one in Hong Kong, too.

The comparisons form a staple of bar room chatter in both Asian cities.

After Singapore’s manicured dormitory suburbs, the sometimes over-weaning presence of the state and its tame media, Hong Kong’s fast pace polity and bare-knuckled local press can be a breath of fresh air. FULL POST

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August 2nd, 2012
08:35 AM GMT
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Editor’s note: Outlook is CNN's in-depth look at business climates around the world. To August 12, 2012, we’re focusing on Singapore.

Singapore (CNN) – Singapore has no room for solar mirror farms, its coast is used for ports and shipping lanes and its tropical air may be ideal for holidaymakers, but no good to generate wind power.

Despite these natural disadvantages, the country is trying to position itself as a world leader in clean energy. FULL POST

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July 30th, 2012
05:29 AM GMT
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Editor’s note: Outlook is CNN's in-depth look at business climates around the world. To August 12, 2012, we’re focusing on Singapore.

Singapore (CNN) – Kiat W. Tan, CEO of Gardens by the Bay, has built a “people’s garden” with solar powered “super trees” and vast glasshouses, all in the shadow of Singapore’s imposing Marina Bay Sands hotel.
Tan tells Richard Quest why the only way to make the botanical garden a success in the city was to be big and bold.

CNN’s Outlook series often carries sponsorship originating from the countries we feature. However CNN retains full editorial control over all of its reporting.

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July 23rd, 2012
05:18 AM GMT
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Editor’s note: Outlook is CNN's in-depth look at business climates around the world. To August 12, 2012, we’re focusing on Singapore.

Singapore (CNN) – Singapore’s strategic position at the mouth of the Strait of Malacca – one of the world’s critical energy chokepoints – has always meant the resource-poor city state has occupied a special place in the world of geopolitics.

Almost all of East Asia’s oil supplies must pass through the narrow shipping strait making Singapore one of the world’s busiest ports, but also vulnerable to shifts in the region’s energy mix.

The recent unrest in the Middle East – which has some analysts saying that $100 per barrel is likely to be the default benchmark oil price for some time to come - has demonstrated to Singapore that its energy security hinges on reducing its exposure to price and supply risks. FULL POST

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July 20th, 2012
03:19 PM GMT
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Editor’s note: Outlook is CNN's in-depth look at business climates around the world. To August 12, 2012, we’re focusing on Singapore.

Singapore (CNN) – In the drive for economic development, sometimes the fundamentals are forgotten. And nothing is more fundamental than clean water.

It is estimated that 800 million people live without access to safe drinking water; a fact that convinced Singaporean Oliva Lum to use her expertise as a chemist to address the problem.

Lum devised a solution and business plan to help quench the thirst of her home nation. She sold her house and car to raise capital to fund the project. FULL POST

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July 20th, 2012
11:04 AM GMT
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Editor’s note: Outlook is CNN's in-depth look at business climates around the world. To August 12, 2012, we’re focusing on Singapore.

Singapore (CNN) – How did the banking community lose its integrity?

Singapore’s Minister for Finance, Tharman Shanmugaratnam, believes that culture had a part of play.

“We have to find a way to get back to a system that has individual and collective responsibility,” he told Richard Quest.

“Firstly, I think we went through a period of regulatory naivety, on both sides of the Atlantic and globally; deregulation went too far. Second, self regulation didn’t work. Part of the reason was an excessive faith in mathematical models and a loss in the role of judgement and responsibility among boards and senior management.

“These are not problems inherent in banking or global finance, these are problems especially of the last ten years.”

CNN’s Outlook series often carries sponsorship originating from the countries we feature. However CNN retains full editorial control over all of its reporting.

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July 18th, 2012
05:11 PM GMT
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Editor’s note: Outlook is CNN's in-depth look at business climates around the world. To August 12, 2012, we’re focusing on Singapore.

Singapore (CNN) – The glass skyscrapers of the business district is how much of the world sees Singapore. Drive to the west of the city state and you see a very different view where the real economy is hard at work.

In tiny Singapore they make things, lots of things, and sometimes in partnership with companies like Keppel, very large and expansive things like oil rigs.

It is perhaps surprising to learn that around a quarter of Singapore’s GDP comes from manufacturing and is a world leader in oil rig manufacture. Keppel hope to keep that position and is currently building 30 oil rigs, with 20 set to be delivered next year. Each one costs at least $200 million.
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July 17th, 2012
05:26 PM GMT
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Editor’s note: Outlook is CNN's in-depth look at business climates around the world. To August 12, 2012, we’re focusing on Singapore.

Singapore (CNN) – Singapore may rock when economic crises hit Europe or the U.S., but it is well placed to come through turbulent times, Piyush Gupta, CEO of DBS bank, told Richard Quest.

“Singapore gets buffeted quite widely,” he said, as its economy is closely correlated with the fortunes of the U.S., Europe and, to a degree, China.

The CEO of the Singapore-based bank since 2009, Gupta believes that the way the Singaporean government guides industry makes the city state more resilient than many.

“You try and build resiliency so that the ups and downs, while they are sharp on an average cycle, keep Singapore progressing well,” he said.

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July 16th, 2012
07:20 PM GMT
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Editor’s note: Outlook is CNN's in-depth look at business climates around the world. To August 12, 2012, we’re focusing on Singapore.

Singapore (CNN) – It is 47 years since Singapore became an independent city state and a swamp was transformed into an economic powerhouse.

Fostering a sense of identity among Singaporeans was key to its early development, which is why city planners in the 1960s made public housing a priority, giving 80% of the population a place to live.

Today the building continues as the trading port, once an important stop on the Silk Route, is one of the three busiest in the world and welcoming more shipping each year.

If trade and a maritime history have made Singapore what it is today, the city’s planners are already looking to the future and other industries to keep its economy in check. Tourism has joined hi-tech and precision manufacturing as priorities for the government with long-term plans for growth.

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July 11th, 2012
04:06 PM GMT
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Editor’s note: Outlook is CNN's in-depth look at business climates around the world. To August 12, 2012, we’re focusing on Singapore.

Singapore (CNN ) – At less than 700 square kilometers and fewer than 6 million people, the city-state of Singapore may be one of Asia’s smallest countries, yet its economic influence far outstrips its size. Next week, CNN will be focusing on Singapore for a special week of coverage in this blog and on TV.

The country is a global hub for exports, a financial capital and an increasingly popular tourism destination. Its GDP per capita, nearly $50,000, is one of the world’s highest, on par with the most developed countries in Europe.

That’s quite an achievement for what was a poor, undeveloped British colony just 50 years ago. The per capita GDP in 1961 was just $1,136. Author Michael Schuman writes in his book “The Miracle,” that “Singapore’s transformation from down-and-out tropical outpost to vibrant metropolis of international stature is one of the great tales of the [Asian Economic] Miracle.”
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